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Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Happy New Year - Resolutions MPHS Alumni



We are developing the following collective set of new Year's Resolutions and commentary. If you would like to join us and add your thoughts sign up at: 

 groups.yahoo.com/group/EmpehiReunion


Resolutions


Eat Less

Workout More

Lose Weight

Save some money

Be nice to my spouse

Help the kids

Help the poor

Travel More

Run Spiel Chek

Run Gramar check more offn and better

Go to my High School Class Reunions

___________________________


Wag more. Bark less. Will Hepburn





That could be ruff - Ron McComb


I just think he has an itch that is needing to be scratched, flees probably. Ron Veenstra 

You guys are impawsable!  Will Hepburn


This doggerel is going to the dogs. Craig Hullinger 66


*Doggerel* is a derogatory term for verse 

considered of little literary value. The word probably derived from *dog*, suggesting either ugliness, puppyish clumsiness, or unpalatability (as in food fit only for dogs). "Doggerel is attested to have been used as an adjective since the fourteenth century and a noun since at least 1630.


How much is that doggerel in the window. Tom Schildhouse
I know it's hard to mess with perfection, so New Year's Eve resolutions are a struggle for me. That not withstanding, I resolve to have more interesting experiences and I am determined, in spite of my wife's opinion that I spend a lot of time trying to kill myself, to not die in the process.

Tom Schildhouse 66






Happy New Year - Resolutions MPHS Alumni



We are developing the following collective set of new Year's Resolutions and commentary. If you would like to join us and add your thoughts sign up at: 

 groups.yahoo.com/group/EmpehiReunion


Resolutions


Eat Less

Workout More

Lose Weight

Save some money

Be nice to my spouse

Help the kids

Help the poor

Travel More

Run Spiel Chek

Run Gramar check more offn and better

Go to my High School Class Reunions

___________________________


Wag more. Bark less. Will Hepburn





That could be ruff - Ron McComb


I just think he has an itch that is needing to be scratched, flees probably. Ron Veenstra 

You guys are impawsable!  Will Hepburn


This doggerel is going to the dogs. Craig Hullinger 66


*Doggerel* is a derogatory term for verse 

considered of little literary value. The word probably derived from *dog*, suggesting either ugliness, puppyish clumsiness, or unpalatability (as in food fit only for dogs). "Doggerel is attested to have been used as an adjective since the fourteenth century and a noun since at least 1630.


How much is that doggerel in the window. Tom Schildhouse
I know it's hard to mess with perfection, so New Year's Eve resolutions are a struggle for me. That not withstanding, I resolve to have more interesting experiences and I am determined, in spite of my wife's opinion that I spend a lot of time trying to kill myself, to not die in the process.

Tom Schildhouse 66






Happy New Year - Happy Anniversary


Happy New Year- Happy Anniversary




December 31, 1963....Tonight is the 50th Anniversary of Jan and my first date. A Hi-Y club party in the basement of my house. We had a band and we danced and ate my Mom's homemade donuts. 17 days later we were going steady. What a long strange trip it's been. Happy 50th anniversary Hon!




James Dart MPHS Alumni

Janet Dart What a special night! I love you too....forever.



Clint Dart How lucky I am to have you both as my parents. Happy New Year's eve.



Laura Dart Melega WOW!! That is so neat!! Thank you for sharing this. You have both worked very hard at your marriage (and your parenting) and the rewards of your hard work are very evident. Everyone who knows you has been blessed by you both!

Happy New Year - Happy Anniversary


Happy New Year- Happy Anniversary




December 31, 1963....Tonight is the 50th Anniversary of Jan and my first date. A Hi-Y club party in the basement of my house. We had a band and we danced and ate my Mom's homemade donuts. 17 days later we were going steady. What a long strange trip it's been. Happy 50th anniversary Hon!




James Dart MPHS Alumni

Janet Dart What a special night! I love you too....forever.



Clint Dart How lucky I am to have you both as my parents. Happy New Year's eve.



Laura Dart Melega WOW!! That is so neat!! Thank you for sharing this. You have both worked very hard at your marriage (and your parenting) and the rewards of your hard work are very evident. Everyone who knows you has been blessed by you both!

Monday, December 30, 2013

Dummies - Morgan Park and Beverly


I have been puzzled for some time about references to the Rock Island Dummy Line. References to the dummy line are often found in histories of Beverly and Morgan Park, but the term is not explained.  What is now known as the Surburban line that served the communities was originally called the "dummy line".

Now, as a Mount Greenwood Hood I am happy to call my fellow alumni from Beverly/Morgan Park dummies. But I still wanted to know about the origin on the name.



The map above is part of the development map of Washington Heights in 1874, and shows the Dummy Line (aka Suburban line of the Rock Island).

Click below to see the full map

empehi.blogspot.com/2013/12/washington-heights-1874.html

_____________________________________


Wikapedia has the following about railroad "dummies".

steam dummy or dummy engine, in the United States of America and Canada, was a steam engine enclosed in a wooden box structure made to resemble a railroad passenger coach. Steam dummies had some popularity in the first decades of railroading in the U.S., from the 1830s but passed from favor after the Civil War. In Europe, locomotives of this type were described as Tram engines.

It was thought that the more familiar appearance of a coach presented by a steam dummy, as compared to a conventional engine, would be less likely to frighten horses when these trains had to operate in city streets. Later it was discovered that it was actually the noise and motion of the operating gear of a steam engine that frightened horses, rather than the unfamiliar outlines of a steam engine.


Many steam dummies were simply locomotives enclosed in coach's clothing, but some combined an actual railroad coach in the same body with the locomotive, creating an all-in-one vehicle that was a predecessor of later self-propelled railcars, usually powered by electricity or petrol.


Photos of other "Dummies"







"Nearly 80 dummy lines ran in the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Most were short lines that connected suburbs to a central city. For example, a six-mile line linked Independence and Kansas City."

"Accounts vary, but the term “dummy” apparently derived from the silencing equipment on the steam engines so as not to alarm horses. Regardless of the term’s etymology, Warrensburg’s little train was called ‘The Dummy’."
Excerpted from Dummy Line  dummyline.org






The Ridge Historical Society explains the Dummy Name as follows:



Railroad History of the Area
In the early years of the Rock Island Railroad, it saw no need to stop after Englewood until it reached Blue Island, the next real area of civilization. The scattering of farmers along this route did not warrant the necessity of stopping the trains. Produce could be taken by wagon to Chicago or Blue Island. The small population did not require the services of passenger trains. The event that changed this was the construction of the Chicago and Great Eastern Railroad in 1864. This railroad would cross the Rock Island at Vincennes Avenue and Tracy (103rd Street). A small settlement of immigrant railroad workers and farmers developed around this point. This area, known, as "The Crossing" required the trains from both railroads to stop before crossing the other's tracks. This area today is known as Washington Heights.

The Great Eastern, later called the "Pan Handle", agreed to build a small station for the accommodation of the area's residents. It was now possible to travel to downtown Chicago on the train. An additional stop was made at Upwood ( the site of Thomas Morgan's country estate at 91st and Longwood Drive). The Great Eastern provided an "accommodation" train between The Crossing and Chicago, which was essentially the first suburban commuter train to the area. Recollections of residents speak of a "dummy train" painted blue.

Dummy locomotives were a combination locomotive and passenger car housed in a body designed to disguise the steaming beast from skittish horses. The horses were rarely fooled, and the trains limited capacity, slow speed, and habit of jumping off the track hindered the growth of passenger traffic. The name was also applied to the original connection point of the Rock Island main and branch lines at 97th Street (Dummy Junction) and the branch line itself (Dummy Line). While there is no record of the Rock Island using dummy equipment, they did use small locomotives designed to run backwards and forwards. Residents may have named these diminutive locomotives "dummys" as well.



Sounds like a reasonable explanation.  But I think we Mount Greenwoodites will still refer to our Morgan Park / Beverly friends as "dummies".  



Dummies - Morgan Park and Beverly


I have been puzzled for some time about references to the Rock Island Dummy Line. References to the dummy line are often found in histories of Beverly and Morgan Park, but the term is not explained.  What is now known as the Surburban line that served the communities was originally called the "dummy line".

Now, as a Mount Greenwood Hood I am happy to call my fellow alumni from Beverly/Morgan Park dummies. But I still wanted to know about the origin on the name.



The map above is part of the development map of Washington Heights in 1874, and shows the Dummy Line (aka Suburban line of the Rock Island).

Click below to see the full map

empehi.blogspot.com/2013/12/washington-heights-1874.html

_____________________________________


Wikapedia has the following about railroad "dummies".

steam dummy or dummy engine, in the United States of America and Canada, was a steam engine enclosed in a wooden box structure made to resemble a railroad passenger coach. Steam dummies had some popularity in the first decades of railroading in the U.S., from the 1830s but passed from favor after the Civil War. In Europe, locomotives of this type were described as Tram engines.

It was thought that the more familiar appearance of a coach presented by a steam dummy, as compared to a conventional engine, would be less likely to frighten horses when these trains had to operate in city streets. Later it was discovered that it was actually the noise and motion of the operating gear of a steam engine that frightened horses, rather than the unfamiliar outlines of a steam engine.


Many steam dummies were simply locomotives enclosed in coach's clothing, but some combined an actual railroad coach in the same body with the locomotive, creating an all-in-one vehicle that was a predecessor of later self-propelled railcars, usually powered by electricity or petrol.


Photos of other "Dummies"







"Nearly 80 dummy lines ran in the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Most were short lines that connected suburbs to a central city. For example, a six-mile line linked Independence and Kansas City."

"Accounts vary, but the term “dummy” apparently derived from the silencing equipment on the steam engines so as not to alarm horses. Regardless of the term’s etymology, Warrensburg’s little train was called ‘The Dummy’."
Excerpted from Dummy Line  dummyline.org






The Ridge Historical Society explains the Dummy Name as follows:



Railroad History of the Area
In the early years of the Rock Island Railroad, it saw no need to stop after Englewood until it reached Blue Island, the next real area of civilization. The scattering of farmers along this route did not warrant the necessity of stopping the trains. Produce could be taken by wagon to Chicago or Blue Island. The small population did not require the services of passenger trains. The event that changed this was the construction of the Chicago and Great Eastern Railroad in 1864. This railroad would cross the Rock Island at Vincennes Avenue and Tracy (103rd Street). A small settlement of immigrant railroad workers and farmers developed around this point. This area, known, as "The Crossing" required the trains from both railroads to stop before crossing the other's tracks. This area today is known as Washington Heights.

The Great Eastern, later called the "Pan Handle", agreed to build a small station for the accommodation of the area's residents. It was now possible to travel to downtown Chicago on the train. An additional stop was made at Upwood ( the site of Thomas Morgan's country estate at 91st and Longwood Drive). The Great Eastern provided an "accommodation" train between The Crossing and Chicago, which was essentially the first suburban commuter train to the area. Recollections of residents speak of a "dummy train" painted blue.

Dummy locomotives were a combination locomotive and passenger car housed in a body designed to disguise the steaming beast from skittish horses. The horses were rarely fooled, and the trains limited capacity, slow speed, and habit of jumping off the track hindered the growth of passenger traffic. The name was also applied to the original connection point of the Rock Island main and branch lines at 97th Street (Dummy Junction) and the branch line itself (Dummy Line). While there is no record of the Rock Island using dummy equipment, they did use small locomotives designed to run backwards and forwards. Residents may have named these diminutive locomotives "dummys" as well.



Sounds like a reasonable explanation.  But I think we Mount Greenwoodites will still refer to our Morgan Park / Beverly friends as "dummies".  



Sunday, December 29, 2013

The Devil in The White City

  1. A great book about the south side of Chicago. The author combines the stories of the development of the Chicago World's Fair led by Daniel Burnham and an evil guy who murdered many people. A strange combination but it works well.

    TransworldSep 30, 2010 - History - 496 pages


    The Chicago World's Fair of 1893 and its amazing 'White City' was one of the wonders of the world. This is the incredible story of its realization, and of the two men whose fates it linked: one was an architect, the other a serial killer.

    What people are saying - Write a review

    User ratings

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    The vivid imagery and detail is eye-opening. - Goodreads 
    The second thing was that the ending felt abrupt. - Goodreads 
    And, finally, I would have liked more pictures. - Goodreads 
    I wasn't very impressed with Larson's writing style. - Goodreads 
    The author really did his research. - Goodreads 
    I only wish there had been more illustrations. - Goodreads

    Review: The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America

    User Review  - Delilah Howell steinbach - Goodreads
    I was fascinated by the story of HH Hughes, America's first known serial killer. Unfortunately this book is more about the Chicago World's Fair in 1893. I found myself reading only every other chapter ... Read full review

    Review: The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America

    User Review  - Chris Cosci - Goodreads
    An interesting read -- practically two books in one. The first is the story of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair; the second is the story of a serial killer who takes advantage of women coming to Chicago ... Read full review


  2. The Devil In The White City by Erik Larson - Random House

    www.randomhouse.com/crown/devilinthewhitecity/interview.html

    Taken together, the stories of how Daniel Burnham built the fair and how Dr. Holmes used it for murder formed an entirety that was far greater than the story of  ...

  3. The Devil in the White City - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Devil_in_the_White_City

    Jump to Burnham and the architects - Daniel Burnham: the chief architect behind the World's Columbian Exposition (also known as the Chicago World's  ...

  4. The Devil in the White City Quotes by Erik Larson - Goodreads

    www.goodreads.com/.../3486041-the-devil-in-the-white-city-murder-ma...

    28 quotes from The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that ... For this buttoned-up age, forBurnham, it was a letter that could have  ...

  5. Daniel Hudson Burnham (Burnham Plot) - CliffsNotes

    www.cliffsnotes.com › Literature Notes › The Devil in the White City

    Note: The Devil in the White City has two distinct plot lines running through the novel — one for each Burnham and Holmes. The characters in this list are.

  6. Minor Characters: Burnham Plot Characters - Cliffs Notes

    www.cliffsnotes.com › Literature Notes › The Devil in the White City

    Margaret Sherman Burnham Devoted wife of Daniel Burnham, Margaret Burnham ... The Devil in the White City By Erik Larson Character List and Analysis Minor ...

  7. Book Summary - CliffsNotes

    www.cliffsnotes.com › Literature Notes

    The Devil in the White City is a literary nonfiction novel that spans the years ... One plot line centers on Daniel Burnham, the architect who builds the 1893  ...

  8. John Root (Burnham Plot) - CliffsNotes

    www.cliffsnotes.com › Literature Notes › The Devil in the White City

    John Root is the partner of Daniel Burnham; he accepts the challenge of building ... The Devil in the White City By Erik Larson Character List and Analysis John ...
  9. Images for the devil burnham

     - Report images




Our discussion from Facebook




To all of you Chicagoans: If you haven't, you should read "DEVIL IN THE WHITE CITY". My cousin turned me on to it...great book about the Chicago Worlds Fair and serial killings that happened during that time.. All true. The history of Chicago , street names , buildings that still stand, politics...read it. You'll like it!
Like ·  ·  · 8 hours ago ·