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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Those of us born in the 1940's


TO ALL THE KIDS WHO SURVIVED THE 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's!

First, we survived being born to mothers
who smoked and/or drank while they were
pregnant.

They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can and didn't get tested for diabetes.


Then after that trauma, we were put to sleep on our tummies in baby cribs covered with bright colored lead-base paints.


We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles,
locks on doors or cabinets and when we rode
our bikes, we had baseball caps not helmets on our heads.

As infants & children, we would ride in cars with no car seats, no booster seats, no seat belts, no air bags, bald tires and sometimes no brakes.

Riding in the back of a pick-up truck on a warm day was always a special treat.

We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle.

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and no one actually died from this.
We ate cupcakes, white bread, real butter and bacon.. We drank Kool-Aid made with real white sugar.

And, we weren't overweight. 
WHY? 

Because we were always outside playing... that's why!

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the streetlights came on.

No one was able to reach us all day. And, we were O.K.

We would spend hours building our motor bikes out of scraps and then ride them only to find ou we forgot the brakes. After crashing a few times, we learned to solve the problem. 

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's and X-boxes. There were no video games, no 150 channels on cable, no video movies or DVD's, no surround-sound or CD's, No cell phones, No personal computers, no Internet and no chat rooms. 

WE HAD FRIENDS  And we went outside and found them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no lawsuits from these accidents.

We ate worms and mud pies made from dirt

(Not me!). And the worms did not live in us forever.

We were given BB guns for our 10th birthdays, made up games with sticks and tennis balls and, although we were told it would happen,
we did not put out very many eyes.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and yelled, "Yo-ooh, Larry-ee-e".

Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team. those who didn't had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!!

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law!

These generations have produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever.

The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas. We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all.

If YOU are one of them?


CONGRATULATIONS!

You might want to share this with others
who have had the luck to grow up as kids before we regulated so much of our lives for our own good.

While you are at it, forward it to your kids so they will know how brave and lucky their parents were.

Kind of makes you want to run through the

house with scissors, doesn't it ?

Those of us born in the 1940's


TO ALL THE KIDS WHO SURVIVED THE 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's!

First, we survived being born to mothers
who smoked and/or drank while they were
pregnant.

They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can and didn't get tested for diabetes.


Then after that trauma, we were put to sleep on our tummies in baby cribs covered with bright colored lead-base paints.


We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles,
locks on doors or cabinets and when we rode
our bikes, we had baseball caps not helmets on our heads.

As infants & children, we would ride in cars with no car seats, no booster seats, no seat belts, no air bags, bald tires and sometimes no brakes.

Riding in the back of a pick-up truck on a warm day was always a special treat.

We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle.

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and no one actually died from this.
We ate cupcakes, white bread, real butter and bacon.. We drank Kool-Aid made with real white sugar.

And, we weren't overweight. 
WHY? 

Because we were always outside playing... that's why!

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the streetlights came on.

No one was able to reach us all day. And, we were O.K.

We would spend hours building our motor bikes out of scraps and then ride them only to find ou we forgot the brakes. After crashing a few times, we learned to solve the problem. 

We did not have Playstations, Nintendo's and X-boxes. There were no video games, no 150 channels on cable, no video movies or DVD's, no surround-sound or CD's, No cell phones, No personal computers, no Internet and no chat rooms. 

WE HAD FRIENDS  And we went outside and found them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no lawsuits from these accidents.

We ate worms and mud pies made from dirt

(Not me!). And the worms did not live in us forever.

We were given BB guns for our 10th birthdays, made up games with sticks and tennis balls and, although we were told it would happen,
we did not put out very many eyes.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and yelled, "Yo-ooh, Larry-ee-e".

Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team. those who didn't had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!!

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law!

These generations have produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever.

The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas. We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all.

If YOU are one of them?


CONGRATULATIONS!

You might want to share this with others
who have had the luck to grow up as kids before we regulated so much of our lives for our own good.

While you are at it, forward it to your kids so they will know how brave and lucky their parents were.

Kind of makes you want to run through the

house with scissors, doesn't it ?

Orangutan and Dog





This is so enjoyable -- an orangutang and hound dog as BFFs

Enjoy.

Taffy Cannon MPHS 66





Orangutan and Dog





This is so enjoyable -- an orangutang and hound dog as BFFs

Enjoy.

Taffy Cannon MPHS 66





THE SOUND AND THE FURY IN CHICAGO

BY AARON M. RENN 04/25/2013
chicagoloop_1.jpg
The Second City syndrome is alive and well. An anti-Chicago essay masquerading as a book review in the New York Times provides the latest example of the truth of that.  Rachel Shteir, a former New Yorker now living in Chicago, notes the various ills in the Windy City that should come as a surprise to no one, least of all residents:
“Poor Chicago,” a friend of mine recently said. Given the number of urban apocalypses here, I couldn’t tell which problem she was referring to. Was it the Cubs never winning? The abominable weather? Meter parking costing more than anywhere else in America — up to $6.50 an hour — with the money flowing to a private company, thanks to the ex-mayor Richard M. Daley’s shortsighted 2008 deal? Or was it the fact that in 2012, of the largest American cities, Chicago had the second-highest murder rate and the ­second-highest combined sales tax, as well as the ninth-highest metro foreclosure rate in the country? That it’s the third-most racially segregated city and is located in the state with the most underfunded public-employee pension debt? Was my friend talking about how a real estate investor bought The Chicago Tribune and drove it into bankruptcy? Or how 15-year-old Hadiya Pendleton, who performed at Barack Obama’s inauguration, was shot dead near the president’s Kenwood home?"
Illustrating the rule that criticizing Chicago is something that is Simply Not Done, this piece sent locals into collective apoplexy. Huffington Post Chicago provides a roundup of the “epic backlash.”  The Atlantic Cities chimes in with its own roundup of “Everything You Need to Know About Why Chicago Is Furious With Rachel Shteir and The New York Times,” noting that “We don't have to wait for the angry letters to be printed in the next Book Review. The counter-manifestos are already here! In the past few days, it seems, everyone from Gary to Milwaukee has read Shteir's ‘Chicago Manuals’ piece, resulting in a groundswell of angry rebuttals.” An army of angry tweeters spoke out.  And even the mayor addressed the issue. Not a bad day’s work for a theater professor at Depaul (Shteir’s day job).
In a sense Shteir is right. I’ve long noticed that Chicago is basically an echo chamber of boosterism in which everyone is terrorized about deviating from the party line lest they be excommunicated from polite company, a fate that may well indeed await Shteir. And Chicago clearly has manifest problems as a city, many of which she notes, though many of her list such as the perennial disappointment of Cubs fans are clearly more snark than substance.
However, what Shteir and Chicago both miss is the real value proposition of the city. Taken on its own terms, Chicago is a simply fantastic place to live. It has a magnificent lakefront setting, a stunning skyline, fantastic cultural institutions, incredible opportunities to consume (from designer clothing to world class dining), and much more. It may be true that these great things largely benefit those from more affluent precincts with vast tracts of the city left behind in segregated, entrenched poverty, but it’s tough to name a place where that isn’t likewise true. Much of Brooklyn, for example, remains mired in poverty, but no one in New York seems to care and criticisms of it as such are simply shrugged off.
Chicago also has perhaps – at least in my view – the best blend of the best of the elite urban center with much of the best of cities further down the food chain. You can have genuinely walkable neighborhoods, take transit to work, and eat food that would be impressive in any city in the world while simultaneously having a spacious and affordable condo with parking that allows you to drive to a conveniently located Target or Costco to stock up when you need to.



THE SOUND AND THE FURY IN CHICAGO

BY AARON M. RENN 04/25/2013
chicagoloop_1.jpg
The Second City syndrome is alive and well. An anti-Chicago essay masquerading as a book review in the New York Times provides the latest example of the truth of that.  Rachel Shteir, a former New Yorker now living in Chicago, notes the various ills in the Windy City that should come as a surprise to no one, least of all residents:
“Poor Chicago,” a friend of mine recently said. Given the number of urban apocalypses here, I couldn’t tell which problem she was referring to. Was it the Cubs never winning? The abominable weather? Meter parking costing more than anywhere else in America — up to $6.50 an hour — with the money flowing to a private company, thanks to the ex-mayor Richard M. Daley’s shortsighted 2008 deal? Or was it the fact that in 2012, of the largest American cities, Chicago had the second-highest murder rate and the ­second-highest combined sales tax, as well as the ninth-highest metro foreclosure rate in the country? That it’s the third-most racially segregated city and is located in the state with the most underfunded public-employee pension debt? Was my friend talking about how a real estate investor bought The Chicago Tribune and drove it into bankruptcy? Or how 15-year-old Hadiya Pendleton, who performed at Barack Obama’s inauguration, was shot dead near the president’s Kenwood home?"
Illustrating the rule that criticizing Chicago is something that is Simply Not Done, this piece sent locals into collective apoplexy. Huffington Post Chicago provides a roundup of the “epic backlash.”  The Atlantic Cities chimes in with its own roundup of “Everything You Need to Know About Why Chicago Is Furious With Rachel Shteir and The New York Times,” noting that “We don't have to wait for the angry letters to be printed in the next Book Review. The counter-manifestos are already here! In the past few days, it seems, everyone from Gary to Milwaukee has read Shteir's ‘Chicago Manuals’ piece, resulting in a groundswell of angry rebuttals.” An army of angry tweeters spoke out.  And even the mayor addressed the issue. Not a bad day’s work for a theater professor at Depaul (Shteir’s day job).
In a sense Shteir is right. I’ve long noticed that Chicago is basically an echo chamber of boosterism in which everyone is terrorized about deviating from the party line lest they be excommunicated from polite company, a fate that may well indeed await Shteir. And Chicago clearly has manifest problems as a city, many of which she notes, though many of her list such as the perennial disappointment of Cubs fans are clearly more snark than substance.
However, what Shteir and Chicago both miss is the real value proposition of the city. Taken on its own terms, Chicago is a simply fantastic place to live. It has a magnificent lakefront setting, a stunning skyline, fantastic cultural institutions, incredible opportunities to consume (from designer clothing to world class dining), and much more. It may be true that these great things largely benefit those from more affluent precincts with vast tracts of the city left behind in segregated, entrenched poverty, but it’s tough to name a place where that isn’t likewise true. Much of Brooklyn, for example, remains mired in poverty, but no one in New York seems to care and criticisms of it as such are simply shrugged off.
Chicago also has perhaps – at least in my view – the best blend of the best of the elite urban center with much of the best of cities further down the food chain. You can have genuinely walkable neighborhoods, take transit to work, and eat food that would be impressive in any city in the world while simultaneously having a spacious and affordable condo with parking that allows you to drive to a conveniently located Target or Costco to stock up when you need to.



Very Nice Shadow Theatre Presentation


Very nice shadow theatre presentation from Britains Got Talent






Very Nice Shadow Theatre Presentation


Very nice shadow theatre presentation from Britains Got Talent






SYNERGICITY


SYNERGICITY: 

REINVENTING THE POSTINDUSTRIAL CITY

Milwaukee Broadway Street

SynergiCity celebrates the reinvention of industrial districts as mixed-use neighborhoods: warehouses become residences, factories contain offices, and industrial waterfronts are reborn as parks.

The word synergicity describes the social, economic, environmental, and political process through which developers, architects, urban planners, and citizens renew communities.

This exhibition presents stories of transformation in six Midwestern cities: Chicago, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, St. Paul, St. Louis, and Peoria.

EXPLORE A CITY


SynergiCity is made possible through the generous support of the School of Architecture, College of Fine and Applied Arts at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity.  
Imark sponsor logoIllinois sponsor logo


With a particular emphasis on the Rust Belt of the American Midwest, SynergiCity argues that 
cities such as Detroit, St. Louis, and Peoria must redefine themselves to be globally competitive. 
This revitalization is possible through environmentally and economically sustainable restoration of 
industrial areas and warehouse districts for commercial, research, light industrial, and residential 
uses. The volume's expert researchers, urban planners, and architects draw on the redevelopment 
successes of other major cities--such as the American Tobacco District in Durham, North Carolina, 
and the Milwaukee River Greenway--to set guidelines and goals for reinventing and revitalizing the 
postindustrial landscape.

Contributors are Paul J. Armstrong, Donald K. Carter, Lynne M. Dearborn, Norman W. Garrick, 
Mark L. Gillem, Robert Greenstreet, Craig Harlan Hullinger, Paul Hardin Kapp, Ray Lees, Emil 
Malizia, John O. Norquist, Christine Scott Thomson, and James H. Wasley.

"Instead of handing over neighborhoods to city hall or private developers, this book shows that 
the solution to many cities' plights lies within them. Empowering residents to take control of and 
build on community assets, engaging them in community-based organizations that can spearhead 
revitalization and build real quality of place, yields real results. To the extent that they adopt a 
holistic approach to planning and build on a city's intrinsic strengths, they can accomplish miracles.
"--from the foreword by Richard Florida


* Full Disclosure - Ray Lees and I wrote the chapter on Peoria redevelopment.

Craig Harlan Hullinger AICP MPHS Jan 66



SYNERGICITY


SYNERGICITY: 

REINVENTING THE POSTINDUSTRIAL CITY

Milwaukee Broadway Street

SynergiCity celebrates the reinvention of industrial districts as mixed-use neighborhoods: warehouses become residences, factories contain offices, and industrial waterfronts are reborn as parks.

The word synergicity describes the social, economic, environmental, and political process through which developers, architects, urban planners, and citizens renew communities.

This exhibition presents stories of transformation in six Midwestern cities: Chicago, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, St. Paul, St. Louis, and Peoria.

EXPLORE A CITY


SynergiCity is made possible through the generous support of the School of Architecture, College of Fine and Applied Arts at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity.  
Imark sponsor logoIllinois sponsor logo


With a particular emphasis on the Rust Belt of the American Midwest, SynergiCity argues that 
cities such as Detroit, St. Louis, and Peoria must redefine themselves to be globally competitive. 
This revitalization is possible through environmentally and economically sustainable restoration of 
industrial areas and warehouse districts for commercial, research, light industrial, and residential 
uses. The volume's expert researchers, urban planners, and architects draw on the redevelopment 
successes of other major cities--such as the American Tobacco District in Durham, North Carolina, 
and the Milwaukee River Greenway--to set guidelines and goals for reinventing and revitalizing the 
postindustrial landscape.

Contributors are Paul J. Armstrong, Donald K. Carter, Lynne M. Dearborn, Norman W. Garrick, 
Mark L. Gillem, Robert Greenstreet, Craig Harlan Hullinger, Paul Hardin Kapp, Ray Lees, Emil 
Malizia, John O. Norquist, Christine Scott Thomson, and James H. Wasley.

"Instead of handing over neighborhoods to city hall or private developers, this book shows that 
the solution to many cities' plights lies within them. Empowering residents to take control of and 
build on community assets, engaging them in community-based organizations that can spearhead 
revitalization and build real quality of place, yields real results. To the extent that they adopt a 
holistic approach to planning and build on a city's intrinsic strengths, they can accomplish miracles.
"--from the foreword by Richard Florida


* Full Disclosure - Ray Lees and I wrote the chapter on Peoria redevelopment.

Craig Harlan Hullinger AICP MPHS Jan 66



Monday, April 29, 2013

Look, up in the sky, it’s a bird, it’s a plane, its Superman!


  1. ENID, Okla. — Superman is a senior citizen.

    The Man of Steel, the infant of Krypton, Mr. Leaps Tall Buildings at a Single Bound, is 75, making him eligible for Social Security, Medicare and every senior discount in the book.

    Were he of this world, he’d have creaky joints, weak eyes, poor hearing, high cholesterol, gray hair, wrinkles and high blood pressure. But he’s not, of course, he’s indestructible — as long as there’s no kryptonite around.

    Superman was born April 18, 1938, not on the planet Krypton, but in Cleveland, the brainchild of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster.

    He’s been thwarting evil-doers ever since, saving the world, darting into and out of phone booths (a tougher task than bending steel with your bare hands these days), righting wrongs and fighting for truth, justice and the American way.

    Not bad for a 75-year-old dude, huh?
    1. It's a Bird...It's a Plane...It's Superman - Wikipedia

      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It's_a_Bird...It's_a_Plane...It's_Superman

      It's A Bird... It's A Plane... It's Superman is a musical with music by Charles ... from the original Broadway production can be seen in the documentary Look, Up in ...

    2. LOOKits a bird, its a plane, NO ITS SUPERMAN, no wait, its a bird ...

      www.facebook.com/.../LOOK-its-a-bird-its...ITS...its-a-bird/1285473671...

      LOOKits a bird, its a plane, NO ITS SUPERMAN, no wait, its a bird. 655 likes · 0 talking about this.

    3. Look up in the sky, it's a bird, it's a plane – There He Go - Rap Genius

      rapgenius.com/548609/...q.../Look-up-in-the-sky-its-a-bird-its-a-plane

      It's a bird, no, it's a plane, no, it's superman” is a line used frequently in the Superman movie and comic series. Schoolboy indirectly likens himself to Superman, ...

    4. Smallville LookIt's a bird, a plane, no Its Superman - YouTube

      www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXttRzrWKOk

      May 14, 2011 - Uploaded by SeeMeGame
      This is a clip from Smallville Fianle Please watch in these sequence Pt.8.
    5. More videos for look its a bird »

    6. Amazon.com: Superman Adventures: "Look! Up in the Sky! It's a Bird ...

      www.amazon.com › Movies & TV › Movies
      Amazon.com: Superman Adventures: "Look! Up in the Sky! It's a Bird...It's a Plane... It's Superman!": Superman Adventures: Movies & TV.

    7. It's a Bird! It's a Plane! - truTV.com

      www.trutv.com/library/crime/notorious_murders/celebrity/.../6.html
      "Look! Up in the sky!" an excited woman cries to a group of bystanders on the street while pointing upward. "It's a bird!" another woman cries. "It's a plane!" a man ...
    8. Images for look its a bird

       - Report images

    Look, up in the sky, it's a bird, it's a plane, its - Enid News & Eagle

    enidnews.com/opinion/.../Look-up-in-the-sky-it-s-a-bird-it-s-a-plane-its
    Apr 20, 2013 – Superman is a senior citizen. The Man of Steel, the infant of Krypton, Mr. Leaps Tall Buildings at a Single Bound, is 75, making him eligible for ...